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The Emergence of the Sound Engine

Peter Luining

Saturday 21 October 2003 at 7:30 p.m.

In conjunction with Electric City: A Month of Electronic Music and Media Events in Vancouver

sponsored by the Mondriaan Foundation, Amsterdam

UBC Robson Square, 800 Robson Street

The Belkin Satellite is pleased to participate in the programming for Electric City: A Month of Electronic Music and Media Events in Vancouver. As part of this interdisciplinary festival the gallery has invited Dutch artist and Internet theorist Peter Luining to make a public presentation at UBC Robson Square on Tuesday, October 21st at 7:30 pm.

Peter Luining studied contemporary philosophy in the mid 1980’s and subsequently became active in Amsterdam’s vj scene. In 1996, he began making autonomous works on the Internet. His presentation of the work clickclub at the 1997 Transmediale Festival in Berlin, earned him international recognition and the unofficial title of “next-generation Superbad.” Since then, Luining has continued to develop innovative works for the Internet, the gallery, and site-specific works that use Internet technology. Notable amongst these is an interactive network for the staff of the Bruggerbouw Oost Building in The Hague, which houses the Dutch Department of Justice. He has been invited to exhibit in such prestigious venues as the ICA (London), De Appel (Amsterdam), and Sonar 2001 (Barcelona). In the spring of 2000, Luining curated an international survey of net.art entitled NeT effEcTs.

Peter Luining’s work is unique within the relatively new field of net.art because of its visual and sonic minimalism. His manipulation of Internet tools often involves demonstrating the underlying abstract form of computer code – a way that frustrates accepted use of the net and opens up possibilities of deconstruction and creative play in equal measure. This is evident in Luining’s recently released ZNC browser, which converts urls to ascii numbers and, from there, to animated sound and visuals. His presentation in Vancouver will explore the potential of sound engines – small pieces of software that allow users to make sound and audiovisual compositions. This will involve a demonstration of the ZNC browser and a historical discussion of net.art in relation to the concerns of abstract painting, particularly the work of Piet Mondriaan, Peter Halley and Sarah Morris.

Luining’s work is exemplary in bridging contemporary developments in sonic culture and net culture with the history of visual art. His presentation promises to offer a unique platform for dialogue amongst Vancouver’s various artistic, media and scientific communities. This presentation has been made possible with the generous support of the Canada Council for the Arts and the Mondriaan Foundation, Amsterdam.

For further information please contact: Jana Tyner at jana.tyner@ubc.ca,
tel: (604) 822-1389, or fax: (604) 822-6689